First-Line Friday #79

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A Hero for Miss Hatherleigh (Regency Brides: Daughters of Aynsley #1)

by: Carolyn Miller

42190077

About the Book

London

November 1818

Surely a prospective husband must elicit greater feeling than the comfort experienced when wearing one’s favorite slippers?

I love Carolyn’s novels. They are always so well written and so, so good! Carolyn’s seventh novel, A Hero for Miss Hatherleigh, releases this coming Tuesday, March 19, 2019. I highly recommend purchasing a copy ASAP. And, definitely check back here on Tuesday for my review of this book It’s another home run for Carolyn.


NOW IT IS YOUR TURN!

GRAB THE BOOK YOU ARE CURRENTLY READING, OPEN TO CHAPTER ONE, AND POST THE FIRST SENTENCE (OR SECOND SENTENCE) IN THE COMMENTS BELOW.

THEN HEAD ON OVER TO HOARDING BOOKS TO SEE ALL OF THE FLF PAGES THIS WEEK (JUST CLICK ON THE FLF BUTTON BELOW).

First Line Fridays hosted by Hoarding Books

26 thoughts on “First-Line Friday #79

  1. lelandandbecky says:

    Happy Friday and weekend! My first line is from “KNOX: The Montana Marshalls” by Susan May Warren:

    “Oh goody, now Knox go to watch his trouble-making little brother break his ornery neck.”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. rbclibrary says:

    My first line comes from The Lady of Tarpon Springs by Judith Miller. I lived in Tarpon Springs the first year of my marriage, so I am eager to read this book. Just have to make the time. 😉 “Zanna Krykos closed her eyes and offered a silent prayer for God’s direction.”

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Kay Garrett says:

    June 1868
    Dismal, Nevada – Never has a town been named so right.
    The sheriff’s office and the barbershop were in the same building because the sheriff and the barber were the same man. Penny Scott suspected the man made more money at his barbering.
    By Mary Connealy
    2clowns at arkansas dot net

    Liked by 1 person

  4. thebeccafiles says:

    Those are pretty big slippers to fill.. and I really like comfy slippers! haha
    Today on my blog I shared the first line from Fated by Teri Terry but I’m currently reading Dead Letter by Chautona Havig. I just started so I’ll share the first line from chapter 2 where I currently am: “Hard benches, spartan furnishings, packed conditions—though she’d purchased a second-class ticket as instructed, Madeline couldn’t help but feel like she’d gotten little better than emigrant car accommodations.” Hope you have a great weekend! Spring is in the air! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Paula Shreckhise says:

    Since we are reading the same book AGAIN, I will give the first line of the newest Barbour Collection: Erie Canal Brides:
    Johhnie Alexander’s story- Journey of the Heart.

    Charity Sinclair furrowed her brow as she read what she’d written for the umpteenth time.

    Happy reading!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. claire o'sullivan says:

    I just finished a clean, but a non-Christian book and it turned out to be terrific, and I rather suspect the author is a Christian. Called The Auctioneer by DJ Williams. The first chapter is basically the prologue, very short and chapter 2 is where the story begins. This is the first line: ‘After twenty-four years of unconditional love, followed by two weeks of disbelief, I stood beside a fresh mound of dirt wondering if I’d been a good son.’

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Fiction Aficionado says:

    This is what I’m reading too!

    I’ve shared the first line from Crystal Walton’s “Romancing the Conflicted Cowboy” on my blog, but since I’m reading Carolyn Miller’s “A Hero for Miss Hatherleigh” right now, I’ll share the first line of the scene I’m up to (in chapter 5):

    Gideon looked up from the specimen and almost dropped it.

    Have a great weekend 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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