First-Line Friday #34

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This week, our theme is “in like a lion, out like a lamb.”

A Most Noble Heir

by: Susan Anne Mason

35138329

About the Book

Derbyshire, England

March 1884

Nolan Price scanned the fields of newly budding greenery that stretched as far as he could see and slowly inhaled the scent of grass, soil, and freshly spread manure. Warmth curled through his chest with a feeling of such intense satisfaction that he wished he could ring the village bell to let everyone know of his joy.

A Most Noble Heir is an engaging page-turner that I highly recommend if you are looking for a good story to escape into. The reason I chose this book to showcase this week is because of Edward, Earl of Stainsby (Nolan’s father). At the beginning of this book, Edward is lion. He is mean, cold, and gruff. He often roars orders at his servants, and expects all to bend to his will. He reminds me of Beast from Beauty and the Beast. But, by the end of the story, Edward transforms into a lamb. Edward’s story is actually my favorite part of A Most Noble Heir!

Check back tomorrow for my full review of A Most Noble Heir. If my review isn’t enough to tempt you back, I will have news regarding TWO giveaways for this book. LOL!

I hope you have an excellent Friday, and a restful weekend!


Now it is your turn! Grab the book you are currently reading, open to chapter one, and post the first sentence (or second sentence) in the comments below. Then head on over to Hoarding Books to see all of the FLF pages this week (just click on the FLF button below).

First Line Fridays hosted by Hoarding Books

24 thoughts on “First-Line Friday #34

  1. susandyer1962 says:

    Happy Friday!

    My FLF comes from a book I’m reading now, Only Yours by Susan Mallery….

    MONTANA HENDRIX’S perfectly good morning was thwarted by a hot dog, a four-year-old boy and a Lab and golden retriever mix named Fluffy.

    Have a great weekend and happy reading!😀

    Liked by 1 person

  2. carylkane says:

    Opening the door was the hardest part. Not that she expected to find it locked, because no one out here in this part of Texas ever locked anything. The Countess and the Cowboy by Kathleen Y’Barbo from the Seven Brides for Seven Texas Rangers Romance Collection

    Happy Friday and Happy Reading! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Anneliese Dalaba says:

    I’ve looked at this book several times, but haven’t purchased it yet. I think I will after reading your post. The book I’m featuring on my blog this week is Love on the Mend by Karen Witemeyer. I love all the books I’ve read of hers. Here, I will share the first line of chapter 17 from the book I’m currently reading, The Social Tutor by Sally Britton. “Thomas waited for her arrival, this time on Christine’s side of the brook, his breath turning to fog in the cold air.” Wishing you a wonderful weekend.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. lelandandbecky says:

    Happy Friday! My first line is from Bridgette by Patricia PacJac Carroll:

    “Bridgette, get up. The sun and the rest of us have been working for three hours.”

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Beware Of The Reader says:

    Happy Friday!
    My first lines are “Poppy!” Jamie came rushing out of the office and into the ktichen. The grin on his face made my heart flutter, just like it always did, which meant I’d been a mess of flutters since the day I met him five years ago.
    It’s from The Birthday List by Devney Perry
    Have a great weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Yvette - Bookworlder says:

    I’m sharing from Mary Connealy’s Now and Forever on my blog today, but here are the first lines of another second in series book with a heroine that loves tending her sheep, Beloved Hope by Tracie Peterson:

    Oregon City, Oregon
    May 1850

    “You can’t be serious.” Hope Flanagan looked at the man who sat opposite her at her sister and brother-in-law’s kitchen table. “You expect me to testify at the Cayuse trial.”

    Happy Friday!

    Liked by 1 person

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